Publications

The John Innes Centre Publications Repository contains details of all publications resulting from our researchers.

The repository also includes Open Access publications, which can be identified by the icons found on search results.

 Green open access publications are marked by the PDF icon. Click on the publication title, or the PDF icon, and read a pre-print PDF version of the publication.  Gold open access publications have the gold open padlock icon. You can read the full version of these papers on the publishing journal’s website without a subscription. 

The creation of this publications repository was funded by BBSRC.

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Charpentier M. (2018)

Calcium Signals in the Plant Nucleus: Origin and Function.

Journal of Experimental Botany

Publisher's version: 10.1093/jxb/ery160

ID: 58733

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Abstract

The universality of calcium as an intracellular messenger depends on the dynamics of its spatial and temporal release from calcium stores. Accumulating evidence over the past two decades supports an essential role for nuclear calcium signalling in the transduction of specific stimuli into cellular responses. This review focusses on mechanisms underpinning changes in nuclear calcium concentrations and discusses what is known so far, about the origin of the nuclear calcium signals identified, primarily in the context of microbial symbioses and abiotic stresses.

Kelner A., Leitão N., Chabaud M., Charpentier M., de Carvalho-Niebel F. (2018)

Dual Color Sensors for Simultaneous Analysis of Calcium Signal Dynamics in the Nuclear and Cytoplasmic Compartments of Plant Cells.

Frontiers in plant science (9) 245

Publisher's version: 10.3389/fpls.2018.00245

ID: 58296

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Abstract

Spatiotemporal changes in cellular calcium (Ca2+) concentrations are essential for signal transduction in a wide range of plant cellular processes. In legumes, nuclear and perinuclear-localized Ca2+oscillations have emerged as key signatures preceding downstream symbiotic signaling responses. Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) yellow-based Ca2+cameleon probes have been successfully exploited to measure the spatiotemporal dynamics of symbiotic Ca2+signaling in legumes. Although providing cellular resolution, these sensors were restricted to measuring Ca2+changes in single subcellular compartments. In this study, we have explored the potential of single fluorescent protein-based Ca2+sensors, the GECOs, for multicolor and simultaneous imaging of the spatiotemporal dynamics of cytoplasmic and nuclear Ca2+signaling in root cells. Single and dual fluorescence nuclear and cytoplasmic-localized GECOs expressed in transgenicMedicago truncatularoots andArabidopsis thalianawere used to successfully monitor Ca2+responses to microbial biotic and abiotic elicitors. InM. truncatula, we demonstrate that GECOs detect symbiosis-related Ca2+spiking variations with higher sensitivity than the yellow FRET-based sensors previously used. Additionally, in bothM. truncatulaandA. thaliana, the dual sensor is now able to resolve in a single root cell the coordinated spatiotemporal dynamics of nuclear and cytoplasmic Ca2+signalingin vivo. The GECO-based sensors presented here therefore represent powerful tools to monitor Ca2+signaling dynamics invivoin response to different stimuli in multi-subcellular compartments of plant cells.

Thorpe S. D., Charpentier M. (2016)

Highlight on the dynamic organisation of the nucleus.

Nucleus (Austin, Tex.) (1) 1-9

Publisher's version: 10.1080/19491034.2016.1243634

ID: 55243

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Abstract

The last decade has seen rapid advances in our understanding of the proteins of the nuclear envelope, which have multiple roles including positioning the nucleus, maintaining its structural organisation, and in events ranging from mitosis and meiosis to chromatin positioning and gene expression. Diverse new and stimulating results relating to nuclear organisation and genome function from across kingdoms were presented in a session stream entitled "Dynamic Organisation of the Nucleus" at this year's Society of Experimental Biology (SEB) meeting in Brighton, UK (July 2016). This was the first session stream run by the Nuclear Dynamics Special Interest Group, which was organised by David Evans, Katja Graumann (both Oxford Brookes University, UK) and Iris Meier (Ohio State University, USA). The session featured presentations on areas relating to nuclear organisation across kingdoms including the nuclear envelope, chromatin organisation, and genome function.

Thorpe S. D., Charpentier M. (2016)

Highlight on the dynamic organisation of the nucleus.

Nucleus (Austin, Tex.) (Nucleus) http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19491034.2016.1243634

Publisher's version: 10.1080/19491034.2016.1243634

ID: 55240

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Abstract

The last decade has seen rapid advances in our understanding of the proteins of the nuclear envelope, which have multiple roles including positioning the nucleus, maintaining its structural organisation, and in events ranging from mitosis and meiosis to chromatin positioning and gene expression. Diverse new and stimulating results relating to nuclear organisation and genome function from across kingdoms were presented in a session stream entitled "Dynamic Organisation of the Nucleus" at this year's Society of Experimental Biology (SEB) meeting in Brighton, UK (July 2016). This was the first session stream run by the Nuclear Dynamics Special Interest Group, which was organised by David Evans, Katja Graumann (both Oxford Brookes University, UK) and Iris Meier (Ohio State University, USA). The session featured presentations on areas relating to nuclear organisation across kingdoms including the nuclear envelope, chromatin organisation, and genome function.

Charpentier M., Sun J., Martins T. V., Radhakrishnan G. V., Findlay K., Soumpourou E., Thouin J., Véry A. A., Sanders D., Morris R. J., Oldroyd G. E. (2016)

Nuclear-localized cyclic nucleotide-gated channels mediate symbiotic calcium oscillations.

Science (352) 1102-5

Publisher's version: 10.1126/science.aae0109

ID: 53291

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Abstract

Nuclear-associated Ca(2+) oscillations mediate plant responses to beneficial microbial partners--namely, nitrogen-fixing rhizobial bacteria that colonize roots of legumes and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi that colonize roots of the majority of plant species. A potassium-permeable channel is known to be required for symbiotic Ca(2+) oscillations, but the calcium channels themselves have been unknown until now. We show that three cyclic nucleotide-gated channels in Medicago truncatula are required for nuclear Ca(2+) oscillations and subsequent symbiotic responses. These cyclic nucleotide-gated channels are located at the nuclear envelope and are permeable to Ca(2+) We demonstrate that the cyclic nucleotide-gated channels form a complex with the postassium-permeable channel, which modulates nuclear Ca(2+) release. These channels, like their counterparts in animal cells, might regulate multiple nuclear Ca(2+) responses to developmental and environmental conditions.

Charpentier M., Sun J., Wen J., Mysore K. S., Oldroyd G. E. (2014)

ABA promotion of arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization requires a component of the PP2A Protein Phosphatase Complex.

Plant Physiology (166) 2077-2090

Publisher's version: 10.1104/pp.114.246371

ID: 48581

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Abstract

Legumes can establish intracellular interactions with symbiotic microbes to enhance their fitness, including the interaction with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. AM fungi colonize root epidermal cells to gain access to the root cortex and this requires the recognition by the host plant of fungal made Myc factors. Genetic dissection has revealed the symbiosis signaling pathway that allows recognition of AM fungi, but the downstream processes that are required to promote fungal infection are poorly understood. Abscisic acid (ABA) has been shown to promote arbuscule formation in tomato. Here we show that ABA modulates the establishment of the AM symbiosis in Medicago truncatula by promoting fungal colonization at low concentrations and impairing it at high concentrations. We show that the positive regulation of AM colonization via ABA requires a PP2A holoenzyme subunit PP2AB'1. Mutations in PP2AB'1 cause reduced levels of AM colonization which cannot be rescued with permissive ABA application. The action of PP2AB'1 in response to ABA is unlinked to the generation of calcium oscillations as the pp2aB'1 mutant displays a normal calcium response. This contrasts with application of high concentrations of ABA that impairs Myc factor induced calcium oscillations suggesting different modes of action of ABA on the AM symbiosis. Our work reveals that ABA functions at multiple levels to regulate the AM symbiosis and that a PP2A phosphatase is required for ABA promotion of AM colonization.

Charpentier M., Oldroyd G. E. (2013)

Nuclear calcium signaling in plants

Plant Physiology (163) 496-503

Publisher's version: 10.1104/pp.113.220863

ID: 42021

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Charpentier M., Vaz Martins T., Granqvist E., Oldroyd G., Morris R. (2013)

The role of DMI1 in establishing Ca ( 2+) oscillations in legume symbioses.

Plant Signaling and Behaviour (8) e22894

ID: 41589

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De Luis A., Markmann K., Cognat V., Holt D. B., Charpentier M., Parniske M., Stougaard J., Voinnet O. (2012)

Two microRNAs linked to nodule infection and nitrogen-fixing ability in the legume Lotus japonicus.

Plant Physiology (160) 2137-2154

Publisher's version: 10.1104/pp.112.204883

ID: 41143

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Granqvist E., Wysham D., Hazledine S., Kozlowski W., Sun J., Charpentier M., Vaz Martins T., Haleux P., Tsaneva-Atanasova K., Downie J. A., Oldroyd G. E., Morris R. J. (2012)

Buffering capacity explains signal variation in symbiotic calcium oscillations.

Plant Physiology (160) 2300-2310

Publisher's version: 10.1104/pp.112.205682

ID: 41142

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Murray J. D., Muni R. R., Torres-Jerez I., Tang Y., Allen S., Andriankaja M., Li G., Laxmi A., Cheng X., Wen J., Vaughan D., Schultze M., Sun J., Charpentier M., Oldroyd G., Tadege M., Ratet P., Mysore K. S., Chen R., Udvardi M. K. (2011)

Vapyrin, a gene essential for intracellular progression of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis, is also essential for infection by rhizobia in the nodule symbiosis of Medicago truncatula

Plant Journal (65) 244-52

Publisher's version: 10.1111/j.1365-313X.2010.04415.x

ID: 38536

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Charpentier M., Oldroyd G. (2010)

How close are we to nitrogen-fixing cereals?

Current Opinion in Plant Biology (13) 556-564

Publisher's version: 10.1016/j.pbi.2010.08.003

ID: 38086

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Perry J., Brachmann A., Welham T., Binder A., Charpentier M., Groth M., Haage K., Markmann K., Wang T., Parniske M. (2009)

Tilling in Lotus japonicus identified large allelic series for symbiosis genes and revealed a bias in functionally defective ethyl methanesulfonate alleles towards glycine replacements

Plant Physiology (151) 1281-1291

Publisher's version: 10.1104/pp.109.142190

ID: 18933

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Charpentier M., Bredemeier R., Wanner G., Takeda N., Schleiff E., Parniske M. (2008)

Lotus japonicus CASTOR and POLLUX are ion channels essential for perinuclear calcium spiking in legume root endosymbiosis.

Plant Cell (20) 3467-79

Publisher's version: 10.1105/tpc.108.063255

ID: 37121

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Sandal N., Petersen T. R., Murray J., Umehara Y., Karas B., Yano K., Kumagai H., Yoshikawa M., Saito K., Hayashi M., Murakami Y., Wang X., Hakoyama T., Imaizumi-Anraku H., Sato S., Kato T., Chen W., Hossain M. S., Shibata S., Wang T. L., Yokota K., Larsen K., Kanamori N., Madsen E., Radutoiu S., Madsen L. H., Radu T. G., Krusell L., Ooki Y., Banba M., Betti M., Rispail N., Skøt L., Tuck E., Perry J., Yoshida S., Vickers K., Pike J., Mulder L., Charpentier M., Müller J., Ohtomo R., Kojima T., Ando S., Marquez A. J., Gresshoff P. M., Harada K., Webb J., Hata S., Suganuma N. (2006)

Genetics of symbiosis in Lotus japonicus: recombinant inbred lines, comparative genetic maps, and map position of 35 symbiotic loci.

Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions (19) 80-91

Publisher's version: 10.1094/MPMI-19-0080

ID: 37103

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