Prof Graham Moore

Programme Leader (Designing Future Wheat)
Crop Genetics

Graham’s research provides an understanding of chromosome pairing within wheat and enables the incorporation of genes from wild relatives into the wheat genome to provide beneficial traits for yield and resilience.

His research has focused on recombination within the cereals.

Graham is also working to understand the genes involved in the temperature sensitivity of meiosis which will be important for growing wheat in a warming environment. 

  • Wheat breeding
  • Genetic recombination in wheat and cereals
  • The effect of temperature on meiosis


Inducing chromosomes derived from different wheat varieties to recombine is fundamental to plant breeding. Fertility of polyploid species, such as many flowering plants, depends on pairing and recombination at meiosis occurring only between true homologous chromosomes. Pairing between the highly related, but more diverged homoeologous chromosomes also present does not produce fertile plants.

In hexaploid wheat, a single major locus (Ph1) ensures that chromosome pairing and recombination at meiosis is restricted to true homologues. Investigating the mechanism of Ph1 provides novel insights into the control and regulation of homologue recognition and crossover. To this end, Graham's group developed the concept of cereal synteny and applied this to characterize the Ph1 locus. At the same time, in collaboration with Peter Shaw, they have been applying cell biology approaches to investigate the Ph1 mechanism.

The group is also involved in understanding the effect of temperature on wheat meiosis, and its subsequent effect on seed set; and in characterizing the gametocidal locus, which is involved in inducing chromosome fragmentation during pollen mitosis.

Professor Graham Moore recognised for exceptional contribution to wheat research

read more

New wheat genome sequence assembly is most accurate and complete to date

read more

WISP course on Wheat Genetics 2015

read more

Uncovered, the mystery of exchanging genes with wild relatives

read more

Selected Publications

Martin A. C., Rey D. R., Shaw P., Moore G. (2017)

Dual effect of the wheat Ph1 locus on chromosome synapsis and crossover

Chromosoma not yet available pnot yet available

Publisher’s version: 10.1007/s00412-017-0630-0

Moore G. (2015)

Strategic pre-breeding for wheat improvement

Nature Plants 1 p15018

Publisher’s version: 10.1038/NPLANTS.2015.18

Martin A., Shaw P., Phillips D., Reader S., Moore G. (2014)

Licensing MLH1 sites for crossover during meiosis

Nature Communications 5 p5580

Publisher’s version: 10.1038/ncomms5580

Griffiths S., Sharp R., Foote T. N., Bertin I., Wanous M., Reader S., Colas I., Moore G. (2006)

Molecular characterization of Ph1 as a major chromosome pairing locus in polyploid locus in polyploid wheat

Nature 439 p749-752

Publisher’s version: 10.1038/nature04434

Prieto P., Shaw P., Moore G. (2004)

Homologue recognition during meisos is associated with a change in chromatin conformation.

Nature Cell Biology 6 p906-908

Recent Publications

Watson A., Ghosh S., Williams M., Cuddy W. S., Simmonds J., Santome M. -. D., Hatta M. A. M., Hinchliffe A., Steed A., Reynolds D., Adamski N., Breakspear A., Korolev A., Rayner T., Dixon L. E., Riaz A., Martin W., Ryan M., Edwards D., Batley J., Raman H., Rogers C., Domoney C., Moore G., Harwood W., Nicholson P., Dieters M. J., DeLacy I. H., Zhou J., Uauy C., Boden S. A., Park R. F., Wulff B. B. H., Hickey L. T. (2018)

Speed breeding: a powerful tool to accelerate crop research and breeding

Nature Plants

Publisher’s version: 10.1038/s41477-017-0083-8

Rey M. D., Martin A., Higgins J., Swarbreck D., Uauy C., Shaw P., Moore G. (2017)

Exploiting the ZIP4 homologue within the wheat Ph1 locus has identified two lines exhibiting homoeologous crossoverin wheat-wild relative hybrids

Molecular Breeding 37 p95

Publisher’s version: 10.1007/s11032-017-0700-2

Draeger T., Moore G. (2017)

Short periods of high temperature during meiosis prevent normal meiotic progression and reduce grain number in hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

TAG. Theoretical and applied genetics. Theoretische und angewandte Genetik N/A pN/A

Publisher’s version: 10.1007/s00122-017-2925-1

View All

Graham Moore

  • Dr Azahara Carmen Martin Postdoctoral Scientist
  • Tracie Draeger Research Assistant
  • Liz Sayers Research Assistant


Royal Society Darwin Medal (jointly with Professor Mike Gale), 1998


For media enquiries, please contact the JIC communications team 01603 450962,

JIC Cookie Policy. We use cookies on this site to enhance your user experience. By clicking any link on this page you are giving your consent for us to set cookies. You can find out more about the cookies by clicking here.

Accept cookies