13 March 2012

New research could make it easier to grow health-promoting blood oranges

For the red pigmentation to develop, blood oranges normally require a period of cold as they ripen. The only place to reliably grow them on a commercial scale is in the Sicilian area of Italy around Mount Etna. Here, the combination of sun and cold sunny days and warm nights provides ideal growing conditions.



Scientists have identified the gene responsible for blood orange pigmentation, naming it Ruby, and have discovered how it is controlled.
“Blood oranges contain naturally-occurring pigments associated with improved cardiovascular health, controlling diabetes and reducing obesity,” said Professor Cathie Martin from the John Innes Centre on Norwich Research Park.  “Our improved understanding of this trait could offer relatively straightforward solutions to growing blood oranges reliably in warmer climates through genetic engineering.”

The pigments are anthocyanins, flavonoids that give red, purple and blue fruit their colour. Previous studies have shown that drinking blood orange juice reduces oxidative stress in diabetic patients, protects DNA against oxidative damage and that it may reduce cardiovascular risk factors more generally, as demonstrated for other high-anthocyanin foods.

A 2010 study found that blood orange juice limits the development of fat cells and weight gain in mice and provides resistance to obesity compared to blond orange juice or water.



Blood oranges are grown outside Sicily, for example in Japan, South Africa and Iran. But in some years entire harvests are lost because the right conditions cannot be created during ripening. Or in Florida and Brazil, the anthocyanin content is weak and unreliable.

The scientists isolated the Ruby gene from the flesh of blood and blond oranges. They found that it is controlled by mobile genetic elements that are activated by the stress of cold.

They accessed all globally known blood orange types to analyse whether any produce anthocyanins without cold. Most blood orange cultivars originated directly or indirectly from Sicily, but one old variety, Jingxian, is of Chinese origin. In the Jingxian variety, the production of anthocyanins is dependent on a different mobile element, but again this is activated by cold.
“Our results offer little hope of conventionally breeding or identifying new varieties of blood orange that are free from cold dependency,” said Professor Martin.
“We are now experimenting with hooking the Ruby gene up with a specific fruit promoter so it can be induced in another way.”

Blood oranges are a derivative of sweet orange, the most commonly grown fruit tree in the world. The current study, to be published in The Plant Cell, also confirmed that sweet oranges are a hybrid between the Southeast Asian pummelo and mandarin.

The research was funded by an EU project focused on flavonoids, FLORA, an EU project called ATHENA focussed on anthocyanins and polyphenols, a studentship from the John Innes Foundation, strategic funding from the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) and the Italian Agronanotech project.

It led the scientists on an historical as well as scientific journey, unearthing the earliest paintings featuring blood oranges, 19th century botanical drawings and their earliest mentions in historic texts.

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Contacts: 

JIC Press office:

Zoe Dunford, zoe.dunford@nbi.ac.uk, 01603 255111, 07768 164185

Andrew Chapple, andrew.chapple@nbi.ac.uk, 01603 251490, 07713 087883






Reference:

Butelli, E., Licciardello, C., Zhang,Y.,  Liu, J., Mackay, S., Bailey, P., Reforgiato-Recupero, G., and Martin, C. (2012). Retrotransposons control fruit-specific, cold-dependent accumulation of anthocyanins in blood oranges. Plant Cell. 10.1105/tpc.111.095232






Notes to Editors: 

About the John Innes Centre:


The John Innes Centre, www.jic.ac.uk, is a world-leading research centre based on the Norwich Research Park www.nrp.org.uk. The JIC’s mission is to generate knowledge of plants and microbes through innovative research, to train scientists for the future, and to apply its knowledge to benefit agriculture, human health and well-being, and the environment. JIC delivers world class bioscience outcomes leading to wealth and job creation, and generating high returns for the UK economy. JIC is one of eight institutes that receive strategic funding from the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council and received a total of £28.4M investment in 2010-11.

The ATHENA project

The ATHENA project follows on from a European FP6-funded study which investigated the relationship between flavonoid intake and chronic disease such as heart disease and cancer. Research with animal models and targeted human trials evaluated the beneficial effects of prolonged flavonoid intake on health parameters such as coagulation and inflammation.

ATHENA will provide a deeper investigation of the promising relationship between dietary habits and chronic disease through human studies. The results will help inform effective, accurate dietary recommendations and preventive health strategies. www.athena-flora.eu/ 

About BBSRC

BBSRC invests in world-class bioscience research and training on behalf of the UK public. Our aim is to further scientific knowledge to promote economic growth, wealth and job creation and to improve quality of life in the UK and beyond.

Funded by Government, and with an annual budget of around £445M, we support research and training in universities and strategically funded institutes. BBSRC research and the people we fund are helping society to meet major challenges, including food security, green energy and healthier, longer lives. Our investments underpin important UK economic sectors, such as farming, food, industrial biotechnology and pharmaceuticals.

For more information about BBSRC, our science and our impact see:http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk 

For more information about BBSRC strategically funded institutes see:http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/institutes




 

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