Modern slavery and human trafficking statement

The John Innes Centre is an independent, world leading international centre of excellence in plant science and microbiology.

Our mission is to generate knowledge of plants and microbes through innovative research, to apply knowledge to benefit agriculture, the environment, human health and well-being, to train scientists for the future and engage with policy makers and the public.

We are a truly international organisation, employing staff from more than 24 countries. Our culture is inclusive and equitable. We were the first institution to hold an Athena Swan Gold award.

In the pursuit of excellence, it is our responsibility to ensure that our research is conducted according to appropriate ethical, legal and professional frameworks, obligations and standards. We provide a research environment that is underpinned by a culture of integrity and based on good governance, best practice and support for the development of researchers.

As a registered charity, John Innes Centre has a responsibility to ensure that the funds it disperses are properly spent, in accordance with the law, funder requirements and in the public interest. We support the requirements of the Modern Slavery Act 2015 and we are committed to carrying out procurement activities in an environmentally, socially, ethically and economically responsible manner.

Our supply chains fall mainly under five ‘super-categories’, which are:

  • Laboratory Consumables and Equipment
  • Library Resources
  • Professional Services
  • ICT Equipment and Services
  • Estates Goods and Services

A significant amount of our procurement is undertaken through our membership of the London Universities Purchasing Consortium(LUPC), a non-profit professional buying organisation owned by its Members. LUPC is a leader in promoting respect for human rights in public supply chains and is committed to supporting the UK Government’s National Action Plan, to implement the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights.

The principal categories which LUPC deems as carrying material risks are laboratory consumables, ICT equipment and some estates services, such as cleaning and security services. LUPC has focused on these highest risk categories by running pilot due diligence projects in laboratory gloves, cleaning services and security services, and by maintaining its affiliation to monitoring organisation Electronics Watch.

During 2018 we will

  • Work with our current suppliers to get a better understanding of the actions they are taking to ensure compliance with the Modern Slavery Act 2015
  • Review our processes for identifying potential suppliers to the institute and ensure that there is clear guidance to all those who engage suppliers regarding modern slavery

This statement has been approved and published by the Chair of the Board of Trustees, Stuart Holmes and will be reviewed at least annually.

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