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John Innes Centre

Dr Jun Fan

Dr Jun Fan

 

What is good for you is bad for infectious bacteria

3rd March 2011

Plants are able to protect themselves from most bacteria, but some bacteria are able to breach their defences. In research published in Science, JIC scientists have identified the genes used by some strains of the bacterium Pseudomonas to overwhelm defensive natural products produced by plants of the mustard family, or crucifers.

“Microbes only become pathogens when they find a way to infect a host and overwhelm the host defences,” said lead author Dr Jun Fan from the John Innes Centre on the Norwich Research Park.

“Our findings answer some important questions about host-pathogen biology.”

The scientists have confirmed that the chemicals used by cruciferous plants to defend against bacteria are isothiocyanates, nitrogen and sulphur-containing organic compounds produced by plants of the mustard family, such as cabbage, broccoli and Brussels sprouts. These potent molecules have antioxidant, anticancer and anti-inflammatory properties in humans.

Isothiocyanates are released by the plant when it is challenged or eaten. They had previously been shown to be active against bacteria but this is the first time their essential role has been successfully tested using real plants. Without this class of compounds, crucifers would be more vulnerable to disease from a much wider variety of bacteria.

Isothiocyanates also provide a chemical barrier to harmful fungi and a toxic defence warning to insects and other herbivores.

The team of scientists from JIC and the University of Edinburgh found that bacterial pathogens carrying the sax genes, thought to be involved in detoxification and removal of isothiocyanates, were able to overcome these defences.

Understanding how some bacterial strains become specialised to overcome plant resistance will help scientists identify new ways to improve crop plants.

“These discoveries have a broader significance for current efforts to increase food security,” said co-author Dr Peter Doerner from Edinburgh University. 

“They define a strategy for sustainable disease control in agriculture by stimulating the production and variety of natural products in various crop plants.”

The research was initiated by former JIC director Professor Chris Lamb and he is an author on the paper.

“Chris supported the research for over a decade up until his death in 2009,” said Dr Fan.

“This is a good example of his pursuit of excellence and relevance in scientific research.”

The work at JIC was funded by the BBSRC.
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Contacts

IFR Press Office
Zoe Dunford, Tel: 01603 255111, email: zoe.dunford@jic.ac.uk
Andrew Chapple, Tel: 01603 251490, email: andrew.chapple@jic.ac.uk

 

Notes to Editors:

Full reference: Pseudomonas sax Genes Overcome Aliphatic Isothiocyanate-Mediated Non-Host Resistance in Arabidopsis, Science 4 March 2011. DOI: 10.1126/science.1199707

The John Innes Centre, www.jic.ac.uk , an institute of the BBSRC, is a  world-leading research centre based on Norwich Research Park www.nrp.org.uk . Its mission is to generate knowledge of plants and microbes through innovative research, to train scientists for the future, and to apply its knowledge to benefit agriculture, human health and well-being, and the environment. JIC delivers world class bioscience outcomes leading to wealth and job creation, and generating high returns for the UK economy.

 

BBSRC is the UK funding agency for research in the life sciences and the largest single public funder of agriculture and food-related research.

Sponsored by Government, in 2010/11 BBSRC is investing around £470 million in a wide range of research that makes a significant contribution to the quality of life in the UK and beyond and supports a number of important industrial stakeholders, including the agriculture, food, chemical, healthcare and pharmaceutical sectors.

BBSRC provides institute strategic research grants to the following:
The Babraham Institute, Institute for Animal Health, Institute for Biological, Environmental and Rural Studies (Aberystwyth University), Institute of Food Research, John Innes Centre, The Genome Analysis Centre, The Roslin Institute (University of Edinburgh) and Rothamsted Research.

The Institutes conduct long-term, mission-oriented research using specialist facilities. They have strong interactions with industry, Government departments and other end-users of their research.

For more information see: http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk