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JI's most significant scientific contribution - RESULT

During the JI's centenary year we asked visitors to this site to vote for what they thought was JI's most significant scientific contribution. The Centenary Committee listed the following 5 achievements. People voted online and after 100's of votes were cast, there emerged a clear winner with Antibiotic Research claiming an impressive 46% of the total votes cast. The results for all 5 acheivements can be viewed at the bottom of this page.

Antibiotic research Wheat semi-dwarfing genes Advances in cereal breeding Semi-leafless peas John Innes Compost
Antibiotic research
Wheat semi-dwarfing genes
Advances in cereal breeding
Semi-leafless peas
John Innes Compost

JIC pioneered the genome sequencing of Streptomyces. These soil microbes are the source of most of our antibiotics and other drugs used in human and veterinary medicine including anti-cancer drugs. Building on this ground breaking research JIC is now searching for new antibiotics to combat superbugs such as MRSA and C. difficile.

During the 'Green Revolution' in the 1960s and 70s, world wheat yields almost doubled as a result of the introduction of dwarfed, high-yielding wheat varieties and new cultivation methods resulting from research developed at JIC.

The establishment of a common genetic framework of barley, wheat, rice, maize, sorghum and millet, which are ‘road maps’ to desirable traits providing a toolkit for researchers worldwide was developed at JIC. Recent research characterising a gene that controls how chromosomes pair will now enable the introduction of new characters into cereal crops.

The first registered 'semi-leafless' pea varieties arose out of research and breeding work at the JIC. The improved crop productivity and standing ability led to the use of ‘semi-leafless’ peas worldwide and they account for 100% of current UK dried pea varieties today.

In the mid 1930's the formulae for the 'John Innes Composts' were developed to provide a sterile, well-balanced growing medium for experimental plant material. These formulae were subsequently released to the public and dominate the compost market in the UK.

Watch supporting presentations

At a recent public event speakers gave short presentations supporting each of the 5 achievements listed above.

Antibiotic research Wheat semi-dwarfing genes Advances in cereal breeding Semi-leafless peas John Innes Compost

Supported by
Merv Bibb

Supported by
Margaret Boulton

Supported by
Graham Moore

Supported by
Mike Ambrose

Supported by
Bob Flowerdew

 

Final Results

After 100's of votes were cast, there emerged a clear winner with Antibiotic Research claiming an impressive 46% of the total votes cast.